Does IE Take a comma?

Does IE Take a comma?

Writers often ignore the necessary punctuation. The abbreviations “i.e.” and “e.g.” are considered interrupting words within a sentence and require punctuation on both sides to indicate this. You must put a comma or a bracket (parentheses) before the abbreviation and a comma after.

How do I use IE correctly?

E.g. and i.e. are both lowercase when they show up in the middle of a sentence (i.e., like this). Most American style guides recommend a period after both letters in both abbreviations. In general, you add a comma after e.g. and between each subsequent example if there is more than one item in your list.

What does IE mean in English?

id est

Should ie be in parentheses?

If for any reason a writer deems it necessary to use i.e., it should appear in parentheses: Winston Churchill spoke often of his “black dog” (i.e., his gloomy periods). Writers use e.g. to give specific examples of the subject at hand.

What does IE mean in parentheses?

exempli gratia

Is it OK to use IE in an essay?

It is used in academic writing. Both APA and MLA let you use i.e., but you will want to follow whatever style guide you’re supposed to.

What does the IE parenthetical mean?

When a code descriptor in the CPT codebook has a parenthetical note that begins with ie, this means that the term that follows clarifies the intent of the word or phrase preceding the parenthetical statement. If the content of the parenthetical is not met, then the code should not be used.

How do you insert eg?

e.g. is used to introduce examples in a sentence, so it’s always followed by an example or examples. That means e.g. is usually used in the middle of a sentence and never found at the very end. When you use e.g. in a sentence both the letters ‘e’ and ‘g’ should be lowercase.

How do I use IE before a list?

The abbreviation “i.e.,” which stands for the Latin “id est” (“that is”), should be used to precede phrases or clauses that explain or clarify a statement, as in “Bainbridge referred continually to his ‘windfall,’ i.e., his lottery winnings,” or “I have a problem with Zeno, i.e., I detest his dishonesty.” (The “i.e.” …