What is the impact of pollution on human health?

What is the impact of pollution on human health?

Exposure to high levels of air pollution can cause a variety of adverse health outcomes. It increases the risk of respiratory infections, heart disease and lung cancer. Both short and long term exposure to air pollutants have been associated with health impacts. More severe impacts affect people who are already ill.

What are the sources of particulate matter on environment?

Some are emitted directly from a source, such as construction sites, unpaved roads, fields, smokestacks or fires. Most particles form in the atmosphere as a result of complex reactions of chemicals such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, which are pollutants emitted from power plants, industries and automobiles.

How many animals are killed by air pollution?

Over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 sea mammals are killed by pollution every year. People who live in places with high levels of air pollutants have a 20% higher risk of death from lung cancer than people who live in less-polluted areas.

What animal is most affected by air pollution?

Birds

What are the major effects of particulate matter on environment and human health?

Health Effects Exposure to such particles can affect both your lungs and your heart. Numerous scientific studies have linked particle pollution exposure to a variety of problems, including: premature death in people with heart or lung disease.

How does matter affect the environment?

Environmental Impacts Of Particulate Pollution Particulate matter pollution contributes to acid rain and climate change. In addition to the worsening of acid rain, particulate pollution can also change weather patterns, cause drought, contribute to global warming, and cause the ocean to acidify.

How is human health affected by air pollution?

The health effects of air pollution are serious – one third of deaths from stroke, lung cancer and heart disease are due to air pollution. Microscopic pollutants in the air can slip past our body’s defences, penetrating deep into our respiratory and circulatory system, damaging our lungs, heart and brain.