What is an extended metaphor called?

What is an extended metaphor called?

An extended metaphor, also known as a conceit or sustained metaphor, is an author’s exploitation of a single metaphor or analogy at length through multiple linked tenors, vehicles, and grounds throughout a poem or story. Another way to think of extended metaphors is in terms of implications of a base metaphor.

How do you start an extended metaphor?

An extended metaphor extends the metaphor mentioned in the first line throughout an entire poem or paragraph of prose. If you are writing your first extended metaphor poem, start off by creating a free verse poem. Then, you can move on to a structured style, such as a rhyming quatrain or rondel.

What is the difference between metaphors and personification?

Personification. Metaphor is a word or phrase that takes on the meaning of something else. Personification is a figure of speech that attributes human nature and characteristics to something that it not human—whether living or nonliving. …

What is personification and give 5 examples?

Common Personification Examples Lightning danced across the sky. The wind howled in the night. The car complained as the key was roughly turned in its ignition. Rita heard the last piece of pie calling her name. My alarm clock yells at me to get out of bed every morning.