What is the theme of the Lottery by Shirley Jackson essay?

What is the theme of the Lottery by Shirley Jackson essay?

The theme in this short story is that blindly following tradition can be very dangerous. This is shown to the reader through the bizarre ritual of murdering innocent people just because tradition says so. The town has become so immersed in this tradition that they fail to see the damage it is creating in their society.

What is the main theme of the lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

What is the moral lesson in the lottery?

Answer and Explanation: In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition.

What is the message of the lottery?

The primary message of Shirley Jackson’s celebrated short story “The Lottery” concerns the dangers of blindly following traditions. In the story, the entire community gathers in the town square to participate in the annual lottery.

What are some themes of the lottery?

The Lottery ThemesThe Juxtaposition of Peace and Violence. Human Nature. Family Structure and Gender Roles. The Power of Tradition. Dystopian Society and Conformity.

What is the plot of the lottery?

The plot of “The Lottery” involves the selection of a lottery “winner” out of the residents of a small fictitious town. The “winner” will be sacrificed to ensure that the year’s crops are good.

Why was Mrs Hutchinson late to the lottery?

When Tessie Hutchinson arrives late to the lottery, admitting that she forgot what day it was, she immediately stands out from the other villagers as someone different and perhaps even threatening. Perhaps because she is a free spirit, Tessie is the only villager to protest against the lottery.

What is the setting in the lottery?

The setting of “The Lottery” is, according to Shirley Jackson, her village of Bennington, Vermont: In her story, Jackson’s village is a rural area, surrounded by other such villages with people who have lived narrow lives and, perhaps as a result of such lives, appear to have narrow minds, as well.

What is the climax in the short story The Lottery?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the climax is when Tessie is declared the “winner,” the falling action includes the townspeople gathering around her and stoning her, and the resolution is when the town’s life returns to normal.

Why does Tessie say that the lottery is unfair?

Tessie thinks the lottery is unfair because she won. If someone else won, she would not have complained at all. This is an example of situational irony in that the readers do not expect that the winner of the lottery will be killed.

What is the irony in the lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

What is the main conflict of the lottery?

The central conflict in “The Lottery” is the external conflict of person vs. society, because it is the traditions of the village that cause Tessie Hutchinson to be killed, and one other person a year before her.

What is ironic about the description of who holds the events in the lottery?

1)It is ironic that Mr. Summers is such a happy man, because he plans on deciding which member of the community has to die.

Why is the setting of the lottery ironic?

The setting in Jackson’s “The Lottery” is ironic because what the story suggests, and what the reader expects of the setting while reading (normal village with normal people who do normal things) turns out to be untrue. Opposition, or opposites.

How is the ending of the lottery ironic?

As you progress through the book, you are lulled into a sense of comfort and begin wondering who will be the lucky winner. The irony lies at the end of the book, when you realise with horror that the winner is not so lucky after all. The “prize” of the lottery is a public stoning.

What happens to Mrs Hutchinson at the end?

By Shirley Jackson Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.